September 21 25

September 21-25

Monday, September 21

9.4.2.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its
development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is
shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.
On-going: 9.11.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and 9.7.10.10 Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • (10 min) Free Write: Choose one of the memories you wrote about last week and respond to the following:
    • How did I change? (Who was I before and after the situation?)
    • Why did the event or situation occur? What forces were at work?
    • Did I realize the significance of the event at the time? Why or why not?
    • Why was the event or situation important to me?
  • (15 min) Debriefing from Friday: How did it go?
  • (15 min) Quiz on While the Locust Slept through page 77.
  • (20 min) Comprehension check — go through the events and themes of the book so far. Create a timeline as a class.
  • Hand out Vocab packet for lesson 2
  • (30 min) Read pages 97-114 in Locust for tomorrow — we will start this section by reading aloud.

Time at the end to read silently

Tuesday, September 22

9.7.3.3 d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, figurative and sensory
language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting,
and/or characters.
On-going: 9.11.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and 9.7.10.10 Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • (10 min) Free Write:Working with the memory you wrote about yesterday respond to the following:
    • What does my memory reveal or show about the nature of __? (childhood, fear, love, failure, etc.)
    • Who might relate to my memory? Why?
    • Is there a public issue is related to my memory? If so, what is it?
  • (60 min) Start Found Poetry Project
  • Define found and parallel poems:
    • Found Poems: poems that are composed from words and phrases found in another text.
    • Parallel Poems: original poems that use the same line structures as another poem, but focus on a completely different topic. Some words from the original poem are retained, but some words are replaced with new words.
  • Example: found and parallel poem models
  • We are going to write found and parallel poems using page _ of While the Locust Slept. Instructions can be found here.
  • Read pages 115-127 in Locust for tomorrow

Wednesday, September 23

Lumberjack schedule

9.4.1.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
9.7.3.3 d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, figurative and sensory
language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting,
and/or characters.
On-going: 9.11.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and 9.7.10.10 Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • (10 min) Free Write: Choose one of the memories you wrote about last week and respond to the following:
    • How did I change? (Who was I before and after the situation?)
    • Why did the event or situation occur? What forces were at work?
    • Did I realize the significance of the event at the time? Why or why not?
    • Why was the event or situation important to me?
  • (30 min) MCA Prep: "Queen of the Nile" questions and writing prompt
  • 3rd hour: Look-Alike/Sound-Alike words
  • Finish Found poem if needed. Then, write a Parallel Poem:
    • Remember parallel poems are original poems that use the same line structures as another poem, but focus on a completely different topic. Some words from the original poem are retained, but some words are replaced with new words.
    • Follow the directions on the Parallel Poem Instructions sheet to write a parallel poem using your found poem from yesterday.
  • Read pages 129-151 in Locust for tomorrow

Thursday, September 24

9.7.3.3 d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, figurative and sensory
language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting,
and/or characters.

On-going: 9.11.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and 9.7.10.10 Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • (10 min) Free Write:Working with the memory you wrote about yesterday respond to the following:
    • What does my memory reveal or show about the nature of __? (childhood, fear, love, failure, etc.)
    • Who might relate to my memory? Why?
    • Is there a public issue is related to my memory? If so, what is it?
  • Quiz on Locust through page 151
  • Blackout Poems. Watch Austin Kleon's Tedx Talk

And check out some of his examples here

  • Your task: To create a blackout poem from one side of the informational text you read last week, "Boarding Schools." The poem can be about boarding schools or something else entirely. It is up to you. Just remember: rough draft! Box off the words you want and make sure BEFORE you start blacking out the page. Also, Put a scratch piece of paper under the page before you start blacking out with the marker.

All three poems: Found, Parallel, and Blackout are due by the end of the day tomorrow

  • When you are finished, read pages 153-164 in Locust for tomorrow
  • Reminder, I am collecting notebooks tomorrow. Check the list if you want to see what I am looking for.

Reminder: Vocab 2 packets are due tomorrow

Friday, September 25

9.4.2.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its
development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is
shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.
On-going: 9.11.4.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and 9.7.10.10 Write routinely over extended and shorter time frames for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

  • No free write today! Instead, you are organizing and turning in your notebooks.
  • Turn in your vocab lesson 2 packets.
  • Vocab test lesson 2
  • Distribute vocab lesson 3
  • (20 min) Comprehension check — go through the events and themes of the book so far. Create a timeline as a class.
  • Read pages 165-200 in Locust for Tuesday —begin as a class reading aloud
  • Work time for poetry, reading, or vocab
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